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the pentagon budget was basically doubled in the last decade, and in doubling we have lost the ability to prioritize. to make hard decisions, to do tough analyses, to make trades. we also need a review of our defense strategy that makes sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the foundation has funded two efforts along these lines to help advance the best ideas for improving our defense strategy. earlier this year we funded a project by the stimson center which brought together 15 defense experts to examine our strategic defense priorities in some detail and how they should be reformed. today we announce the new coalition for fiscal and national security. the coalition, chaired by admiral mullen, includes senior national security defense and economic officials from both republican and democratic administrations stretching back to more than 30 years as well as leaders from the congress including some very distinguished gentlemen here today. all have served our nation with distinction, and they are joining together now to say very
branches of the u.s. military. we're in constant contact with them. i've just now come from the pentagon as you are aware our minister of defense ehud barak received the highest civil honor given by the secretary of defense to any civilian, the distinguished civil service medal. and i think that stands as a symbol of the deep and multifaceted relations between our two militaries. >> we're out of time. you're a historian. he just said ehud barack, that u.s.-israeli military relations have never been better. you agree? >> i agree. >> thanks for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. >>> in the wake of the scandal surrounding general david petraeus's affair and the investigations into several other high profile generals, does the u.s. military need an ethics boot camp? and more than a decade after a deadly crash, a u.s. airline gets its day in court. many of my patients clean their dentures with toothpaste. i tell them dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean d
to classified information. now, the white house denies this. "outfront" on the story, cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. >> you don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark 30" the story of the hunt for osama bin laden from the oscar winning powerhouse team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same w
on battlegrounds. find out what the pentagon is doing to prevent them from killing innocent people. >>> plus, we're monitoring an explosion at a social security building in arizona. stay with us. ed lobster's crabft ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> a developing situation
and the pentagon. >> there was an event where operatives were involved and they did not know until they got there that the hollywood people were going to be present. so which means their identity would have been shown. >> reporter: king questions whether the military was pressured to cooperate on the film. >> what access they were told to give, some resisted, some acquiesced. >> reporter: cia and pentagon officials say no secrets were given away. >> my understanding is the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, cia locations, that they had access to navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. and i can't really go beyond that other than to say that now, this investigation has gone on and it's been expanded. >> reporter: bowe says he and bigelow were very aware of national security concerns. >> we're acutely aware that there are sensitivities around this material, and i think we approached this with a lot of respect for those sensitivities. >> pretty -- i really want to see this movie. it does raise a legitimate concern about how much cooperation there is between the cia, between
of the conditions and that he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. the pentagon says manning was held in accordance with the rules but if convicted, he could face life in prison. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence covering this at the pentagon. he said he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. they tried to poke some holes in that today. did they succeed? >> in some ways, erin, very much so. they got manning to admit the guards never actually ordered him to drop the blanket that was covering his body. let's back up. manning had made a crack because they had placed so many restrictions on him in confinement that if he really wanted to kill himself he could hang himself by his underwear. the guards took that seriously and that night he was stripped naked, except for a blanket. when he got up the next morning, he had to stand at parade rest. now manning had to admit today that he inferred from what the guard said that he had to drop that blanket to stand at parade rest and he admitted today they never actually said that. and, in fact, manning said that in later days, and in subseq
the pentagon get a blank check while agencies that dispense aid to have to fight for every single nickel that they receive? why do we send and spend without restraint on wars and weapons and destroy life but we squeeze those programs that saved lives? for many years now, and you all heard me, this is my 443rd five-minute speech on this issue, for many years now i've been promoting the idea of smart security. smart security means protecting our interests, not with military force or by maintaining a massive nuclear arsenal, but by investing in development and diplomacy, through humanitarian assistance and partnerships around the world. at the aids conference in washington this past summer, there was a panel discussion on how in the struggle against hiv-aids we can do more with less. and what i want to know is, why do we have to settle for less when it comes to hiv-aids? this is a humanitarian crisis. our sense of moral deansency should be -- should compel us to invest whatever it takes to bring an end to it. it's not just the right thing, mr. speaker, it's the smart thing to do for our nat
have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning about the type of uav, but, again, no evidence that the claims are true. >> how do you view, though, the fact they have shot some drone -- >> again, we have no evidence to hear the claims are true. i'm not going to comment on something about which we have no evidence in its truthfulness. yes? >> jay, thanks. i want to go back to what the president asked in the interview with bloomberg. during the negotiations with speaker boehner, a year ago, he was willing to consider increasing the eligibility age for medicare recipients and slowing benefits for entitlements, and he said he was willing to look at anything that strengthens our system. can you clarify, are those prams that could strengthen the system, is that what he was signaling? >> i will say a couple things that build on and echo what the president said today and in the past. we put forward substantial and specific savings in entitlement programs. both health care entightmentments, and, you know, non-health care manda
, but the pentagon, the joint chiefs, a lot of republican defense hawks, a lot of the defense contractors say not only would the level of cuts in the automatic sequester portion that goes to defense be harmful to national security, but that it would be a huge hit on the economy because there's so many jobs involved. so my sense is people don't want to talk about that because it would raise a lot of alarms but in some ways is more serious than the tax cuts even though they don't all occur at once. it would sends us down a difficult path. it's already created a lot of uncertainty in the defense world. >> some of the more liberal opponents of the deal on the democratic left, would not mind seeing these defense cuts. >> just as they wouldn't mind in some cases on the left seeing the tax increase on everybody so that they can force a vote to lower the rates back only for those americans outside the top 2%, you're right. a lot of liberals would like to see that. this is why the president has leverage. he has some leverage off of his victory in the campaign, but he's got a lot of leverage off of the
. jennifer griffin is live from the pentagon. could the iron dome protect u.s. bases overseas for instance, jennifer? >> reporter: it probably could. the army has a system but it works differently shooting multiple round of bullets rather than missiles at incoming mortars and rockets. missile defense can be very expensive. $90,000 per rocket for instance fired by the iron dome system. yesterday at the pentagon defense secretary panetta received from the defense minister of israel a mold of a tamir missile, part ever the iron dome system that worked so well during the gaza conflict. the u.s. army is investigating buying an iron dome-type system. we already invested $270 million in sealing the dome. they sealed it in record time, three years, despite many skeptics in israel as well as in the pentagon, jon. jon: if we helped fund the system, and our technology, presumably is part of it, why not just buy an iron dome from israel complete? >> reporter: it's a good question. we've learned that raytheon, an antimissile defense manufacturer has proposed something called battle dome back in novembe
in it programs the pentagon is saying we don't want. >> making subs in connecticut. >> they want subs. but, there is a certain reality that -- look at the fence and what happened this week. it was going to be raised. didn't get raised. in that package were defense budgets the pentagon says they don't want funded. they have to be included in the defense budget. >> i agree. to go back to the tax thing, you have to be careful with two thing that is are overlooked. the american federal system of taxes is progressive, very progressive. >> on the books it is. we should make that distinction. >> it is very progressive and way more progressive than countries like the european countries that have less income and equality. the idea that making it more progressive will address it is actually a real stretch. the other thing is we have to be very careful, you guys. it's not what i want. to be careful about what we wish for. it is a very well known fact of the economists and i agree, that the people who write the check are not necessarily the one who support the burden of the tax. when, you know, you ha
for the last -- since anybody can remember as the party that wants to rein in government spend çpentagon. austerity regiment is a republican idea. when it comes time to put the your money where the mouth is, republicans are unable to identify significant cuts other than play on the margins? it makes my central point which is the tea party movement, which are the inmates in control of the asylum and republican party right now is an intellectually bankrupt movement. there is time to show the cuts and they can't do it. >> can i very quickly -- >> that was a psychiatric reference there, martin. you didn't cut him off on that. in fairness -- >> i just want to quickly say, in 2002 dick cheney said deficits don't matter. when republicans crammed through the bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 through reconciliation, they wrote them to expire. they are the ones who made them expire and they did it because it was an accounting gimmick to hide the cost of the bush tax cuts just as they hid the cost of the bush wars, which were also done off the books. they don't care about deficits. they care about fla
with questions about unprecedented and some inappropriate access to classified information. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr spoke to the filmmakers. >> don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark thirty," the story of the hunt for osama bin laden, from the oscar-winning powerhouse team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our
for you? >> no. the pentagon i have to say was fairly cooperative. there were different levels of competence when it came to specific public affairs officials. generally speaking, they were cooperative. but they want you to go through them and i didn't. i generally just found the troops on my own and they put me in touch with their fellow troops. it's interesting, when you were talking about the afghan soldiers, this something i haven't talked about in other interviews. one of the things that's interesting, as i went through the life of this one combat outpost from 2006 to when it's overrun in 2009, is the different levels of competence when it came to the afghan soldiers. unfortunately for the u.s. in that region, in regional command east, eastern afghanistan in 2009, it was one of the worst battalions of afghan soldiers ever. when it was attacked, when combat outpost keating was attacked, most of them ran away or hid or when through the american bar racks stealing ipods and computers. it's no surprise because actually a few months before at another combat outpost a similar th
. out front tonight, barbara starr, pentagon correspondent. this is a new front. drones themselves have changed the entire way this country will fight war forevermore but let's start with the bioswimmer. what can it do? >> reporter: well, this is a very interesting project that was actually funded by the department of homeland security to basically -- it takes the shape of a tuna because tuna can maneuver in the water, they can get into small places, and the idea is if you could put sensors on this, cameras, acoustics, radar, whatever, you could put this kind of device into u.s. bombers, maybe to go through shipwrecks, maybe to go through underground debris, maybe just to keep watch for potential terrorist attacks on u.s. ports. the whole idea with all of these programs is that nature really is, you know, the best way. there's a good lesson to be learned here. these are devices that can move as they do in nature like a tuna. tuna is pretty good at getting through the tight spots under water. >> when you think about just under water, simple things, 90% of the world's goods go by ship. yo
to run the pentagon, that makes for a very interesting senate race in the state of massachusetts, once again. >> maybe, maybe not. what people keep forgetting in all of this is that the massachusetts legislature is run by democrats who could always just change the law back so that there's not a special election and it becomes an appointment, again. yes, some dominos falling in massachusetts if senator kerry gets that post, particularly if there is an election, which is the state of the law right now. scott brown expected to run for it and about as strong a republican as you can get in the state of massachusetts. >> molly ball, thank you so much. lynn sweet, one of my favorite ladies. lynn, i did not get to ask you about your jesse jackson, but i would encourage folks to read on what you wrote over gesjesse jackson jr. over the past week or so. some very insightful reporting. >>> 31 days out to the fiscal cliff. we will go live to see what the president is saying to house leaders and whether that will keep us any further away from the edge. >>> also, how did the president capture the la
who serve and sacrifice. this week, the pentagon released the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. >>> and when we come back, this question, of all of the american presidents, who would you like to interview? made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70
and principlely those cuts in defense will be very, very onerous according to the pentagon and everybody else. do you think that this is a feint or what they need to do just because it takes a while to get these things in order? >> well, you know, i'll leave it to them to decide whether it's a feint but it's dangerous. the defense cuts are devastating, they shouldn't happen, and by the way, they'll be a domestic cuts of comparable quality. actually that's really the republican leverage in the debate, not the tax issue but the spending cuts if we dealt with the tax cuts for 98%, spending cuts would still be there, still have the leverage we need. but look, probably the white house is being prudent. but this is serious. there's a strong disagreement but in the end the two sides have been able to negotiate in the past, speaker boehner's very good negotiator, negotiating the extension of the bush tax cuts two years ago, budget deal in 2011, debt ceiling deal in august of 2011, all those things have led to prosperity or -- faster growth and less spending. i think we should continue to work with him. l
. phillips'. >>> breaking news out of the pentagon. sources tell cnn the u.s. is huddling with allies on what a chemical attack by assad would actually look like. we have a picture from former cia operative and contributor bob bayer to show you what the impact of a single shell of gas would be in launched on homs in syria. the large swath of the city that would be affected. it's estimated about 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to barbara starr. and barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario because if there were to be god forbid a chemical attack, the concern is some could drift across borders. worse even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it acros
is walking and loading its chemical weapons, ready to use them on its own people. nbc's chief pentagon correspondent joins us now. jim, is this the red line president obama was warning about? >> well, not quite yet. u.s. officials tell us that the syrian military is poised to use chemical weapons against their own people, and all it would take really is the final order from syrian president assad. but we have learned that as of today, all the precursored chemicals for that deadly nerve gas have in fact now been loaded on to aerial bombs, but those bombs are still in the depots. they haven't been loaded on to airplanes yet, and president assad hasn't given the order. but they're pretty close, larry, and that's why earlier this week, of course, president obama issued a very strong statement aimed at president assad saying look, if you use these weapons against your people, there will be serious consequences, but that's where somewhat of the problem lies. >> listen, i want to ask you, one of the parts of the red line statement by president obama and secretary of state clinton, that if the
syria deploy chemical weapons, and america is forced to take action, the pentagon estimates it would take 75,000 troops to seize all the regime's weapons. syria is one of eight countries that have not signed in 1992 convention banning chemical weaponry. other countries refusing to sign our israel and north korea and egypt. a u.n. conference in dubai is underway right now. new questions about internet freedom. two dozen countries, including iran, syria, north korea, could be making decisions affecting communications worldwide. catherine herridge has more in washington. reporter: thank you, megyn, and good afternoon. the international telecommunications union, this conference in dubai is viewing rules established long before the internet became a primary method of communication. the u.n. body could impact every day vacation. >> this could affect every cell phone tablet personal computer in the world. pretty much every chip in every type of consumer devices have an ip address associated with them. therefore, there are proposals that the there be a registry for each of those computer chi
in the most remote location, could quickly put it on and put it to work. chris lawrence, cnn, the pentagon. >> wow. i want three of those puppies. >>> we'll be right back. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. at chevy's year-end event, we have 11 vehicles that offer an epa-estimated 30 mpg highway or better. yeah? hey. hey. where's your suit? oh, it's casual friday. oh. [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. now get a 2013 malibu ls for around $199 per month, plus competitive lessees can get $1,000 toward the down payment for an even better deal. well that was uncalled for. folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy, ronny? happier than gallagher at a farmers' market. get happy. get geico. chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcy
of rank. there's all sorts of money to be saved in the pentagon that will have no effect whatsoever on our defensive posture or our capability. >> but steve, i'm curious, though. what is the difference, in your opinion, between raising the top marginal rate and closing some loopholes? if you get $1.2 trillion in revenue, why does it matter so much more to the president that you do it by raising the top rate when the super wealthy, as we've described on the show, aren't going to be paying higher taxes? >> the issue is, joe, it's a question of whether it's going to be $800 billion or $1.2 trillion or somewhere in between. if the number ends up being $1.2 trillion, and we'll see where it comes out, it's hard to do it just with deductions. you end up limiting deductions so much that you cut into charities. you cut into state and local governments. you cut into a whole bunch of home mortgage. >> what about the buffett proposal? >> the buffett proposal is a great idea. the buffett proposal is a kind of no-brainer. >> how much does it raise? >> $160 billion over ten years. it's a piece of the puz
weapons materials, cnn has learned the pentagon and u.s. intelligence services are urgently consulting with syria's neighbors, turkey, israel and jordan. about what to do if it looks like assad is about to launch a chemical attack on his own people. >> as part of the absolute unity that we all have on this issue, we have set an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. and those responsible would be held to account. >> but after tens of thousands of syrians have been killed in months of war. why so much attention now? >> increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons or by losing control of that to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> a chem ka attack could kill thousands of syrians. if the regime loses control, what if terrorists, rebels or insurgent groups get ahold of the chemical weapon and flee across the border. >> nobody knows the neighborhood better than israelis. i can promise you they have sources on the ground. great, clear intelligence on what's going on. >> a senior u.s. official says all the allies are now conside
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)